Rev Peter Hobart – church father and father to 18

A marker memorializing Peter Hobart near the Old Ship Church in Hingham, MA

Peter Hobart was born in Hingham, Norfolk, England on October 13, 1604 to Edmund Hobart, Sr (1573-1649) and Margaret Dewey (1564-1632). He was the fourth child of the family, which would grow to include a dozen children, including seven sons and five daughters. Peter grew to manhood in  Hingham, and attended Magdalene College in Cambridge, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1625 and a master’s degree in art in 1629.

At the age of 23, Peter married 19-year old Elizabeth Ibrook (1608-1645), the first born child of Richard Ibrook (1580-1651) and Margaret Clark (1589-1661) of Southwold, Norfolk. The wedding took place  on July 3, 1628 in Haverhill.
Nearly a year after the wedding on July 12, 1629, Rebecca and Peter became the parents of a little boy they named Joshua Joshua (1628-1717). More babies arrived in quick order. Jeremiah (1630 – 1715), and twins Elizabeth (1632 – 1692) and Josiah (1632-1635).

Sometime after Elizabeth and Josiah were born, Peter’s parents left England for the New World.
A reference to both Peter and his father, Edmund, in the History of Hobarts in America.

In the spring of 1635, Peter, Elizabeth and their four young children- as well as a number of people who attended the church at which Peter preached –  boarded a ship headed for America, arriving at Charlestown, MA, on June 8, 1635.
A brief history of Peter’s  early years in Hingam, MA taken  from The History of the Town of Hingham

Elizabeth was pregnant during the long sea journey, and on October 3, 1635, Ichabod was born – the first colony-born member of the family. He was not, however, the last. In 1637, Elizabeth gave birth to Hannah (1637-1637). Sadly, she lived just 20 days. The next year, another little girl was born, and, as was the custom, she, too was named Hannah (1638-1691). Then followed Bathsheba (1640-1724), Israel (1642-1731), and  Jael (1643-1731). In December 1645, Elizabeth gave birth to Gershom (1645-1707). She died shortly after at the age of just 37.

By this time, Peter was well-established in the community, both as a theologian and a pastor to his growing flock.

Taken from The History of the Town of Hingham

 

He was also the widowed father of 11 children ranging in age from 17 to newborn, a situation which was quickly taken care of when he married 26-year old Rebecca Peck (1620-1693) seven months later on July 3, 1646.
By April of the next year, Rebecca gave birth to Japhet (1647-1670). Like her predecessor, Rebecca continued to have children in rapid succession. Nehemiah was born in 1648 (1648-1712), followed quickly by David (1651-1717), Rebecca (1654-1727), Abigail (1656-1687), Lydia (1658-1732) and finally Hezekiah (1661-1662) when Rebecca was 40.
All together, Peter fathered 18 children with his two wives over a period of  33 years. It’s said that five of his 10 sons graduated from Harvard, and four followed their father’s footsteps into ministry. Peter ministered at the Hingham Congregational Church until his death on January 20, 1679 at the age of 77.
In a perfect twist of fate, Peter’s passing took place the evening before ground breaking occurred for a new church  building to house his beloved congregation.

 

From the MA death records
The Relationship
Peter Hobart Rev (1604 – 1679)
2nd great grandfather of husband of 7th great grand aunt of husband
daughter of Peter Hobart Rev
son of Elizabeth Hobart
daughter of Joshua Ripley
son of Judith Faith Ripley
wife of Lemuel Bingham
father of Hannah Perkins
daughter of Joseph Perkins
son of Mary Perkins
son of Jonathan Fouch
son of William Foutch
son of William Foutch Sr
son of John A Foutch
daughter of James M. Foutch
daughter of Maggie Idella Foutch
daughter of Cornia Brown Williams
son of Maggie Alene Hamby
You are the wife of Jerry Paul White
You are the wife of Jerry Paul White

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